December 8, 2022

I’ll start with a disclaimer based on my own personal taste: if this does to the general watch-buying public what it does to my heartstrings, I bet all of these are sold out already. At more than €100,000, that might be a wild guess, but look at it! After all, the launch of the H. Moser & Cie. Streamliner Tourbillon Bucherer BLUE happened last week, and only 18 of these gem-set Streamliners will be made.

I have an ambivalent relationship with precious stones set into watch cases and bracelets, to say the least. This is probably exacerbated by the proliferation of outré aftermarket abominations based on Subs and Nautiluses, but there are some gleaming (pun absolutely intended) exceptions. For me, the highly unexpected, bejeweled bezel of the Glashütte Original SeaQ diver is a cool exception, but this Streamliner is simply divine. Yes, it is very different from the first Streamliner introduced in 2020, but that could be a good thing.

The H. Moser & Cie. Streamliner doesn’t need gems to shine, so why now?

Well, that is a good question, let’s play through the Streamliner history for you. Launched in 2020 and deeply inspired by the 1920s — the age of Streamliner cars and locomotives — the smoothness is tangible. As if Raymond Loewy had a spiritual hand in the design, it looks like nothing else, and the radial brushing on the sloping bezel-less case was a signature feature. Known for its alluring fumé dials and the castellated seconds track of its Chronograph brother, the Streamliner’s star is still ascending. Only a month ago, our perceptions of the Streamliner shifted laterally through the immense depths of the Vantablack Tourbillon. But that wasn’t enough for Ed Meylan and co.

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The H. Moser & Cie. Streamliner Tourbillon Bucherer

The Bucherer connection

Telling the story of two Swiss family businesses, this is the first Streamliner made for a partner and also a delightful twist to the streamlined tale of the series. Bucherer has a strong history of special editions featuring the signature Bucherer Blue colorway, but this is very different from the norm. While the in-house dial wizards at H. Moser & Cie. could have easily come up with a stunning blue fumé visage, Meylan chose to take it to an even higher level. The entire look of the Streamliner is changed through a redesigned bezel, though that intro is seriously underplaying its significance. It is actually the first time we see something resembling a bezel on an H. Moser Streamliner, and it rocks (pun intended, as always).

The H. Moser & Cie. Streamliner Tourbillon Bucherer

Streamliner Tourbillon Bucherer BLUE — An amphitheater of gems

Though cheekily based on the “standard” 40 × 12.1mm steel model, in the engine room, nothing has changed from the gold Streamliner Tourbillon Vantablack. Running the show is caliber HMC 804, created by Moser’s sister company Precision Engineering. This time, the large tourbillon is just as captivating at 6 o’clock set within a sleek gray fumé dial. The gray tonal choice is elegant, its color creating a connection to the armadillo-like bracelet. The center of the dial is a close match to the brushed steel, and applied indices matching a rounded handset with Globolight inserts are as cool as ever.

This time, however, they perform on a stage within an amphitheater of blue sapphires. Instead of the sloping brushed case, there is an edge of steel outside the crystal. Oh, and the sparkle of 60 flawless dark blue baguette-cut sapphires. The stones are inset in a fan-like pattern, underlining the soft case shape while creating an unusual take on the Streamliner. The stones visually separate the case and bracelet from the dial and only make you notice the tourbillon even more. Some of you might miss the organic flow of the original, but, to be honest, I love the new look. Perhaps it will incite a new, more glamorous take on the enigmatic Moser. Rainbow-bezeled Streamliner, anyone? The H. Moser & Cie. Streamliner Tourbillon Bucherer BLUE is available from Bucherer at a considerable CHF 109,000 (€126,000), and only 18 pieces will be produced.

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Fratelli, what do you think? Has the sleek shape of the Streamliner been compromised? Or is this simply a delicious twist to the story? I fell for the glimmer of gems myself, but let us know what you think in the comments.

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